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02-Apr-2016 14:57

They referred to our temple as “that church”.” Did you know, when you wrote these things, that you were talking about me? If I might borrow a line from Monty Python and the Holy Grail – you didn’t bother to find out, did you? My father was a philosophy teacher who taught me, among other things, to accept the possibility that a tree might not actually be a tree; one does not escape such a childhood with a small mind. On the contrary, I frequently find myself – influenced by my “fundamentalist” Jewish traditions – giving people the benefit of the doubt: I assume they are basically good people, by which I mean they strive to live according to some value set that may or may not match mine. I once jokingly asked my daughter, “What’s a mother?” She responded “someone who makes rules and makes dinner.” Both amused and disheartened by that definition, I thought to ask “What’s a father? Let it be known: I have never tortured small animals, nor do I approve of it.Wood County ADAMHS Board Helping Wood County Citizens Who Need Mental Health, Alcohol, Drug Treatment, Educational, or Prevention Services.Wood County Department of Job and Family Services Wood County Health District The mission of the Wood County Health Department is to work to "assure that conditions in Wood County permit its residents to lead healthy lives." Wood County Hospital Wood County Juvenile Court Judge David Woessner Wood County Juvenile Court Judge Wood County Juvenile Detention Center The Wood County Juvenile Detention Center partners with the Wood County Educational Service Center's ATOD program to help youths turn a corner and lead more productive lives.” She thought a minute and gave the exact same answer: “someone who makes rules and makes dinner.” I do hope her definitions of our identities, our roles, and our contributions to her life will become more sophisticated with time – but at the very least, we seem to be successfully modeling an even partnership. Come to think of it, I lobbied fiercely (and successfully) against even getting our cat declawed when I was younger, to the great dismay of my mother and her treasured afghan.I also cry when I read Charlotte’s Web to my daughter – every time. I am indeed a fundamentalist, if by “fundamentalist” you mean “person who takes seriously the texts and traditions of her people, and strives to live her life in accordance with them.” If what you mean is “barbaric, hate-mongering, misogynistic barbarian,” then no, I’m not a fundamentalist either. Also depends on your definition, I suppose – and one’s definition would likely depend on one’s general perspectives on organized religion.Even if you, yourself, identify as Orthodox.) I will take them from the comments section to this fascinating piece – not because I’m writing about the article, and not because these lines are substantively different from countless others I’ve seen, but because I happened to read this article and these comments the most recently, so they’re the easiest to look up: “small minded, hate mongering misogynists, who interpret Jews by quantity, not quality” “a barbaric fundamentalist cult which is a profound embarrassment to Judaism” “I left orthodox Judaism because my classmates at YU couldn’t stop talking about how a non-orthodox Jew didn’t have a neshama, how a non-Jew didn’t have a neshama, and how the only thing that both groups cared about was sex. )” “The loathsomeness and despicability of the Orthodox knows no bounds.I was daily subject to harrassment when I was in school. In fact, it occurred to me today that I might even take it so personally because you didn’t know you were talking about me. In fact, I find it difficult to hate anyone myself; I certainly do not go around trying to get others to do so. I could respond to that one in so many ways: by talking about my in-depth, text-based, analytical class for women on topics in Jewish Law; by describing my personal gender-related challenges in raising a girl and two boys; by talking about gender roles in my household…

NAMI Wood County Telephone:(419) 352-0626 or The Link 1(800)472-9411 Wood County Educational Service Center Telephone:(419) 354-9010 Children’s Resource Center Telephone: (419) 352-7588 or 1(888) 466-KIDS Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center Telephone:(419) 352-7027 Family Service of Wood County Telephone:(419) 352-4624 Behavioral Connections Telephone:(419) 352-5387 Perrysburg (419) 872-2419 If you need other help, find it in the Wood County Prevention Coalition Resource Guide.

No, this is not the beginning of an AA-style recovery.

(And I use the term “you” loosely and rhetorically, referring to all those whose negative statements about Orthodoxy have appeared on my internet browser over the years.

Copies of Ohio Department of Health death certificates from December 20, 1908-December 31, 1963 are available through the Archives/Library at the Ohio History Center.

Ohio Department of Health Stillborn Death Certificates (December 20, 1908-1935, and 1942-1946) – Information includes name of deceased, sex, date and cause of death, place of burial, names and birthplaces of parents, and mother’s address.

NAMI Wood County Telephone:(419) 352-0626 or The Link 1(800)472-9411 Wood County Educational Service Center Telephone:(419) 354-9010 Children’s Resource Center Telephone: (419) 352-7588 or 1(888) 466-KIDS Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center Telephone:(419) 352-7027 Family Service of Wood County Telephone:(419) 352-4624 Behavioral Connections Telephone:(419) 352-5387 Perrysburg (419) 872-2419 If you need other help, find it in the Wood County Prevention Coalition Resource Guide. No, this is not the beginning of an AA-style recovery.(And I use the term “you” loosely and rhetorically, referring to all those whose negative statements about Orthodoxy have appeared on my internet browser over the years.Copies of Ohio Department of Health death certificates from December 20, 1908-December 31, 1963 are available through the Archives/Library at the Ohio History Center.Ohio Department of Health Stillborn Death Certificates (December 20, 1908-1935, and 1942-1946) – Information includes name of deceased, sex, date and cause of death, place of burial, names and birthplaces of parents, and mother’s address.In Ohio, it became a statewide law to record deaths in 1867.