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27-Aug-2016 02:24

Although disappointed to be far from home on Christmas Eve, Brewer at least took solace in the fact that the perpetual rain, which made moving through the trenches as much of a slog as the war itself, had finally abated on the moonlit night.

All was jarringly quiet on the Western Front when a British sentry suddenly spied a glistening light on the German parapet, less than 100 yards away.

Charles Brewer never expected to be spending Christmas Eve nearly knee-deep in the mud of northern France.

Stationed on the front lines, the 19-year-old British lieutenant with the Bedfordshire Regiment of the 2nd Battalion shivered in a trench with his fellow soldiers.

The new operating system will cost close to £200 for the average home user, or just under £100 to upgrade from an existing Microsoft system.

However, most PCs over two years old will not have enough memory to run the new software.

Speaking to RTÉ News Managing Director of Microsoft Ireland Kevin Dillon describes the important role the Irish HQ has played.

Find out how newspapers across the country reported on the tragedy.

New York Tribune: March 26, 1911 This New York Tribune cover story from March 26 provides a detailed account of the horror that unfolded the day before, citing numerous officials and survivors.

If you can combine the two—the succinct and the satirical—well, then you can strike literary gold.

And there’s no better example of that combination than “The Onion,” which in 2013 celebrated 25 years of laconic lampooning.

Speaking to RTÉ News Managing Director of Microsoft Ireland Kevin Dillon describes the important role the Irish HQ has played.Find out how newspapers across the country reported on the tragedy.New York Tribune: March 26, 1911 This New York Tribune cover story from March 26 provides a detailed account of the horror that unfolded the day before, citing numerous officials and survivors.If you can combine the two—the succinct and the satirical—well, then you can strike literary gold.And there’s no better example of that combination than “The Onion,” which in 2013 celebrated 25 years of laconic lampooning.After Great Britain entered World War I in August 1914, many of them had expected that they would make quick work of the enemy and be home in time for Christmas.